My History in Makeup

I started wearing makeup in the sixth grade, as was common. I started off small with only mascara. It evolved to include eyeshadow, eyeliner, the works. By eighth grade, I was a strong believer in layering mascaras, a technique otherwise known to make your eyelashes clumpy and your mascara flaky. Enter freshman year. I honed my talents by waking up hours before school to do my makeup. I even started filling in my eyebrows. I got my certificate in makeup artistry during my junior year. These days, I go more natural, unwilling to forsake the time I could be spending doing other things (like sleeping).

I did makeup for other people quite often. I would start on the eyebrows, move to eyeshadow, eyeliner, and eyelashes. I would use concealer to clean those up. Then I would use color corrector and foundation. I would set the foundation with powder, bronzer, and blush. Then highlighter would be applied, followed by a lip color. The end. The process would take about an hour, give or take.

I begin my process by filling in my eyebrows. I used to used an auburn color, but I’ve grown to love the lighter look. I use eyeshadow, maybe two different shades at a time. Darker in the my crease, lighter on my eyelid. Then mascara and I’m done. If I move slowly, it takes about thirty minutes. If I’m in a hurry, it’ll take ten.

My routine has changed drastically. I’m not the person I was in high school. I don’t think anyone stays exactly the same. I still do makeup when I’m asked to. If you ever have questions, feel free to email hellolittleredbaker@gmail.com and I will answer them to the best of my ability!

Considering Majors

I, like so many others that I know, have changed my major recently. I went from biomedical sciences to biology. I felt it was necessary and definitely not the end of the world. It’s a decision that is entirely up to you and your judgement, but I felt truly liberated. I went from a major that was demanding and specific to a major that was more open to interpretation and lenient.

I was super fortunate that I switched between sciences, meaning I was on track to graduate on time with either major.

It can be scary, no doubt. I’ve known people to completely switch tracks and refocus their priorities. I mean from business to biology. Changes like that do, unfortunately, mean more time in school. However, remember: time is relative. An extra year or two is nothing compared to a lifetime of happiness spent in your ideal career field.

Preparing for Spring

As a college student, my mind is constantly geared towards what I can do in order to prepare for my classes. I haven’t always done as well in my classes as I would like to, and that is hard to face. I graduated from high school as the valedictorian. I was the typical “I aced the exam and didn’t even have to study” student that annoys everyone. But if it’s any consolation, that has rocked my world. I had zero study skills in high school, and consequently, I brought exactly zero study skills with me to college. On top of that, life happens. Maybe you get a job (or in my case, two) to have spending money or pay your bills. Perhaps you get a puppy that needs attention, grooming appointments, vet appointments, and plenty of playtime. Then maybe you have a roommate you can’t agree with.

My point is that a lot can go wrong and I’ve learned the hard way. If you’re curious, I’m double majoring in biology and philosophy. Here are just a few things that I personally do that could potentially help you.

Give Yourself a Break

When registering for classes, it’s important to keep in mind that you need to eat and take breaks. Leave time to rest between classes. It is also important not to overload your schedule. It’s tempting to take a seventeen hours at once and graduate early, but it just isn’t feasible. I took seventeen hours the first semester of my freshman year. More classes means more assignments, exams, midterms, and finals. Come finals week, I was so exhausted that I could not manage to study for my very last final. Things turned out okay, but only because the professor decided to scale the grades.

Something critical to note is that a 3 credit course doesn’t evenly translate into a 3-hour class. The lecture might be three hours out of your week, but that does not include the time you’ll need to devote to studying, homework, assignments, or getting tutored.

See a Tutor

Tutors exist for a reason. They are so unbelievably helpful. Tutors are excellent at presenting the information to your from a student’s perspective. I would highly recommend that everyone see a tutor, even if only to reiterate the information learned in lecture.

Get a Planner

I know, I know. This one is listed in almost every article/blog post about being a better student and that is because it is essential. I started with an online planner. It was easy to put my entire class schedule into that calendar. I could block out any time I might need for a meeting or lunch or an appointment. It was also easy to keep up with in that I could pull it up on my phone.

I have recently switched over to planner from Plum Paper. If you haven’t heard of them, I highly recommend ordering from this company. Everything about your planner can be customized, something I thoroughly enjoyed. Personally, I added boxes where I can note whether there’s an assignment or exam that day. It also helps me track my studying habits. They offer a student bundle that comes with a notebook, a notepad, and stickers for your planner.

My gorgeous custom planner from Plum Paper